Two swarms are better than one

Our friend Joan has a hive of bees that originated from a swarm we gave her a year ago. Joan’s bees are going gangbusters. Last week a huge swarm the size of a large child separated from her hive.  Joan said, in her wonderful Southern accent, “George, you could put your arms around it and give it a hug.” I couldn’t go along to help George and Joan gather that swarm, but when the phone rang early yesterday afternoon and Joan said, “Guess what!? It happened again,” I had my beekeeper’s suit and camera loaded into the car before she hung up.
DSC_3385b small They were in Joan’s olive tree (the last swarm traveled to her neighbor’s yard, causing a bit of consternation).
DSC_3386b smallThis swarm was tiny in comparison to last week’s, a bit over a foot long and maybe half a foot wide.DSC_3389b small I could get close with no worries – honeybees generally don’t sting if you leave them alone while they’re swarming. They are intent on protecting their new queen (she’s in the center of the swarm), with a few peeling off to to scout for their new home.DSC_3391b small Here’s more of a close-up. They were lined up in neat rows, and holding tightly to one another.DSC_3393b small George thought it would be least disruptive if he could get them to fly voluntarily into the box that he had brought to transport them, called a nuc or nuc box. It’s basically a smaller version of a normal Langstroth hive, ideal for transporting a swarm (unless it’s as big as a small child). The term nuc comes from the fact that the swarm is gathered around the queen — the nucleus of the honeybee colony. To make the box appealing to the swarm, George took a few of the frames that fit into the nuc box and coated them with honey that Joan harvested from the hive last year.  He also added some drops of “bee lure,” which is a mixture of scents used to attract bees. Joan supervised.DSC_3397b smallWe waited about an hour, but although some of the scouts did enter the nuc, there was no mass movement into it. As dusk approached, we decided to suit up and move the bees into the box. George and Joan clipped some of the twigs that were in the way, then carefully cut the main branch and placed the swarm into their new temporary home. George will go back this evening to make sure that all of the stragglers are in the box, then he’ll seal it up and bring it to a friend who needs a hive because hers died over the winter.
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7 comments on “Two swarms are better than one

  1. Janice Adams says:

    What a lovely and interesting story of swarming bee gathering. Putting it up on FB.

  2. Jane Elder says:

    Lovely shots of the bees.

  3. Very cool! Not much is as fun as catching a swarm! Great Pictures! Two summers ago, I caught 5 swarms! It was a blast! Have fun with those Bees!!!!!

  4. […] told you about our friend Joan’s bees. In this post from March, I wrote about an epic swarm that split off from her beehive. Well, sadly, the bees continued to produce more swarms, and […]

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