Vintage Easter Greetings

It’s Easter postcard time again! The Easter bunny (looking more like a dignified Sir Rabbit), and emerging yellow chick wish you “A Happy Easter.” The message on the back, written in pencil in 1912, has faded badly, but the parts I can still read are somber compared to the prettily flowered front. It starts out: “Well Ann, how do you do. We are having a hard time.” The only other part I can read says: “Phil is working himself to death. Your friend, E.”  Yikes!

Vintage Easter postcard

The next card doesn’t have the bright colors of many vintage postcards; its strength is a wonderful heavily embossed design of a chick with a posy of spring flowers. There’s no message on the back other than the sender’s initials, and the date isn’t legible on the postmark. It has a one-cent Benjamin Franklin stamp, which doesn’t help much with dating because that was the price to mail a postcard for very many years.

Vintage Easter postcard

The last one, mailed in 1924, has an overtly religious message: “And they found the stone rolled away from the sepulchre – ‘He is not here but is risen.'” Tiny print under the image at right says “The Women at the Tomb.” On the back is only written “Best Easter wishes from Aunt Sarah.”

Vintage Easter postcard

Want to see more vintage Easter postcards? Here’s my post “Mad Hens” from 2012. And this is “Happy Peeps-Day” from 2013.

Have a wonderful Easter!

My Christmas Greeting

Digging into my vintage postcard collection to share some Christmas cards with you, I found two wonderful animal-related cards.

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Three fluffy kittens bring you “My Christmas Greeting.” Their expressions are mischievous, you know they just messed with the Christmas tree. The half-border is a gold banner with embossed holly leaves and berries. “Vera” of Waterville Maine mailed this postcard to “Miss Mary L. Nutter” of Palermo Maine in 1911. Her handwritten message on the back: “With best wishes for a Merry Xmas, Vera.”

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On a rich dark gold background two beautifully-drawn horses wish you “A Bright and Happy Christmas.” Sweet red flowers – they look like anemones to me – bring a festive feel. This card was sent from Lafayette Indiana to Mr. Edwin W. Savoyer (that’s a guess, it’s pretty illegible to me) of Breinigsville Pennsylvania in 1908, with no written message on the back.

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Both postcards have one-cent stamps. Which reminds me – buy your forever stamps before the rates go up in January; the postcard rate will go up a penny to .34 (still a great deal in my opinion).

And have a wonderful Christmas or whatever you celebrate!