Vintage Turkey Day Postcards

One of my favorite holiday rituals is pulling out my vintage postcard collection to enjoy the wonderful old cards. Last year at this time I showed you three of my favorite Thanksgiving cards. Time for two more!

Thanksgiving postcardI love this type of postcard. where the embossing is the focus of the design. The words “Thanksgiving Greetings” have no color at all; the raised shape of the letters and the shadows thrown have a subtle beauty. And the embossing on the turkey’s feathers is impressive, each feather so carefully drawn and cross-hatched.

The back of the card is so intriguing. On November 24th, 1908, Walter B. of Fremont Nebraska wrote to Miss Anna Okerbloom of Omaha Nebraska: “Dear Friend, What’s the matter? Didn’t you receive my last card or don’t you want to acknowledge it.” We’ve all been there, right? Brave Walter to ask!

A more traditional card, brightly colored, shows a family of turkeys, apparently unaware of their fate – or perhaps Mother is saying farewell to her chicks?

Thanksgiving day The turkeys’ feathers are slightly embossed. The back of the card isn’t nearly as interesting as the first; it was sent in 1908 to Miss Amethyst Wickham of Utica NY, the message only: “With love from Aunt Katie.”

Happy Thanksgiving to all who celebrate it!

Vintage Easter Greetings

It’s Easter postcard time again! The Easter bunny (looking more like a dignified Sir Rabbit), and emerging yellow chick wish you “A Happy Easter.” The message on the back, written in pencil in 1912, has faded badly, but the parts I can still read are somber compared to the prettily flowered front. It starts out: “Well Ann, how do you do. We are having a hard time.” The only other part I can read says: “Phil is working himself to death. Your friend, E.”  Yikes!

Vintage Easter postcard

The next card doesn’t have the bright colors of many vintage postcards; its strength is a wonderful heavily embossed design of a chick with a posy of spring flowers. There’s no message on the back other than the sender’s initials, and the date isn’t legible on the postmark. It has a one-cent Benjamin Franklin stamp, which doesn’t help much with dating because that was the price to mail a postcard for very many years.

Vintage Easter postcard

The last one, mailed in 1924, has an overtly religious message: “And they found the stone rolled away from the sepulchre – ‘He is not here but is risen.'” Tiny print under the image at right says “The Women at the Tomb.” On the back is only written “Best Easter wishes from Aunt Sarah.”

Vintage Easter postcard

Want to see more vintage Easter postcards? Here’s my post “Mad Hens” from 2012. And this is “Happy Peeps-Day” from 2013.

Have a wonderful Easter!

Happy Thanksgiving: Some Vintage Greetings

Let’s keep it going with my holiday vintage postcard series! Last month I showed you some Halloween cards from my collectionIn March, you got to see some fun Easter cards. Valentine’s Day, of course, we celebrated with a Token of Love postcardAnd we started 2013 with 3 beautiful old New Year’s cards.

Without further ado, I bring you … Thanksgiving greetings!

Thanksgiving greetings

A beribboned ear of corn is held aloft by a sweet winged cherub. All that’s written on the back is “From Arlene.” It’s postmarked 1909.

No cherub this young boy. He’s got a nasty little sword, and it looks like he’ll really need it to take down the proud turkey, who’s staring him right in the eye.

Thanksgiving greetings

It’s postmarked 1913, and includes a chatty message to the sender’s sister, including a little sisterly poke that the reason their mother hadn’t answered her card was that she didn’t put her address on it.

Thanksgiving greetings

Finally, this quartet of relieved turkeys celebrate a truly happy Thanksgiving, warbling: “Thanks to him who spared our living; We’re here, we’re here till next Thanksgiving.” The entire message on the back says: “Mother”, and the postmark shows it was mailed from Newark, NJ in 1908.

To all of my friends who celebrate, with or with out turkeys (not in our house anymore), have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

A Token of Love

Only a week until the holiday of hearts and candy, flowers and sweet professions of love. So for Valentine’s Day, here are some vintage postcards, from me to you.

Vintage Valentine's Day postcardThe postmark is illegible, so I can’t tell what year it was mailed.  Since there’s no message or signature on the back, we can just imagine that the addressee, Miss Elinore Trahman of Irvington N.J., either knew who it was from, or had fun dreaming about who her secret friend was! I love the bee in the lower left corner.

Vintage Valentine's Day card

This postcard, a hand-drawn envelope adorned with embossed roses and golden four-leaf clover, was mailed in 1911 to Mrs. A. Upcraft, of New Haven N.Y., with a simple handwritten message on the back: “With Love, G.E. Cass”.

Vintage Valentine's Day card

Finally, “Say Yes, My Valentine.” There’s no writing on the back, and it’s not normal postcard-sized, so it was probably slipped into an envelope. The message is priceless:

I recommend you for a job,

And wish that you would try it;

I’ll gladly “bring the bacon home,”

If you’ll be there to fry it.

Happy Valentine’s Day to all!

Happy New Year!

Don’t you love new beginnings? Nothing better than a fresh start, and a turn of the year is about as fresh as it gets. I found some treasures in my vintage postcard collection to help you celebrate the first new day of 2013.

Vintage New Year postcardThe design, the holly leaves and berries, the horse-shoe for luck, and the words “Happy New Year” are all embossed. The original is a bit more yellow-golden, but I liked the coppery shade of the scan. It’s postmarked Dec. 27, 1907, from New Mexico, and was sent to Miss Annie Roberts of Blair Okla. I can’t read the signature, but the message is: “Dearest girl, I am going to answer your sweet note real soon & not do you like you did me. Hope you are having a good old time nowadays.”

Vintage postcard New Year

Miss Jennie Bouman of Niantic PA received this card from her friend Mrs. Milton Gotshall of Boyertown PA on December 31, 1906. I love the girl with her little sailor suit, and the enthralled kitty with its merry red bow.

Vintage postcard New Year

And finally, a card sent by “E.V.A” from Times Square NY on December 31, 1913, to his or her Benjamin in Wellsley Hills, Mass. On the back: “If you were only here I would wish you a very very happy New Year.”

And so to you the same, although you are not here in person, I thank you all for visiting my blog this past year, and wish you a very very Happy New Year, and an “unbroken chain of the good things that will make you happy”!

Handmade Fabric Postcards

I love postcards! I’ve been collecting vintage postcards for many years, and when I started printing on fabric, I quickly realized that using my fabric designs and images to make postcards was just going to be way too much fun. This is one of my favorites, a self-portrait with text incorporated into the design, some stitching, and a bit of gauzy fabric.

Fabric Postcard

Here’s another, just a photo of our cat Lars that I stitched around.

Fabric Postcard: Lars Sleeping

I’m in the middle of writing and recording a new online class for CraftArtEdu, to teach you how to make your own unique fabric postcards. I just got to the part where I show different options to make the back of the card, and I thought I’d give you a preview. There are so many options to design the back of your card, but one of my favorite techniques is to scan the back of a vintage postcard. Remember if you’re going to sell the cards to use the copyright-free ones. Here’s a photo of two that I picked to use as examples in the class:

Vintage postcard backsI scanned them:

Postcard backs scannedThen I cleaned them up in Photoshop Elements.

Postcard back postcard backs scan 02b smallI’ll work on them some more, might take the color out of the bottom one, depending on how it prints on my fabric.

Have you made fabric postcards? Interested in giving it a try? Let me know! Well, back to making the class now — I’ll let you know when it’s ready. Click here for the link to the online class, check out the preview if you’re interested!